You are currently browsing the daily archive for May 29, 2010.

The environmental damage is not transitory. It will get much worse, no matter what happens. The damage will persist for many years.

BP should be nationalized now (the U.S. company) and their U.S. assets put under control so they can’t all be moved out of reach to Swiss or UK banks, if that isn’t the case already. Draft their U.S. employees. Use their expertise and people and money to solve the problem and reimburse those effected. We need BP drafted into a lifelock with the U.S. Who cares if BP survives — they are only a company. We’re talking about saving people and animals and fish and birds, and compensating for losses to the maximum long-term extent, beyond the scope of precedent of anything short of war reparations. Again, where is the spine and decisiveness of Congress, the White House and the Supreme Court on this?

I’ve been saying this for weeks. Doesn’t anyone care? Doesn’t anyone listen? Too me, the public perception that BP is “cooperating” so closely with the U.S. government, including holding joint press conferences in the Pentagon, suggests that the U.S. is compromised by BP and the UK. Let’s get it right — BP is an environmental criminal. And since when does the criminal stand beside the police chief in press conferences? Compare this reality with the concept that a UK company somehow caused an atomic energy release in the U.S. Would we hold them accountable in a death grip of control and justice that would have repercussions for decades? Of course.

What about resulting risks to our international relationships and the rights of private enterprise? How much does that matter when and as long as life is at stake on this scale?

Visited Saugatuck, MI this week and saw the berthed Keewatin lake steamer, a 350 foot behemoth built at Greenock, Scotland in 1907, and which serviced the Great Lakes until its retirement in 1965. Today it’s a museum you can visit and tour, with much of its interior restored to original appearance. What a treat!
An hour North, at Muskegon, is docked the Milwaukee Clipper, aother 361 foot behemoth, built in 1904 as the luxury lake liner Juniata, and rebuilt as a modern passenger car ferry in 1941, transporting vacationers across the lake until 1970, but today she floats only partially restored after funds ran out. The high-speed catamaran Lake Express berths across the way, and now serves to shuttle cars and visitors between Milwaukee and Muskegon. We sailed her for the first time, westbound, on Wednesday. Comfortable, quiet and fast.

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