The Russian spy case has left me concerned, not just because the Cold War was supposedly over in 1991, nor because a Russian head of state (Putin) and an American President (Bush Sr.) were each head of their country’s spy networks within just the past generation, but because in a time when the current heads of state are enjoying hamburgers and other symbols of compatibility together, we are still learning that deep cover spy operatives remain on duty around the world, just waiting for some weakness or accident or signal to swing into action to subvert another nation, even a supposed ally.

And our respective government state departments are so nonchalant about it all. Are our governments secretly being held hostage? Are we at risk of having Russian spies stand up and wrest control of elements of the economy or our political system at some declension point of stress or vulnerability? Are there separate centers of power within the Russian and American government apparatus with different agendas, working at odds with one another and risking geopolitical unbalance? Is there a deep lack of communication, understanding and common cause between various elements of our governments at the highest levels?

If the recent very public drama between Obama, McChrystal and Eikenberry on our policies in Afghanistan are any indicator, these dissonances within centers of power, deep below the surface, may be more prevalent than we the public ever suspects, or is allowed to know.

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